Mike McGuire

Mike McGuire speaks to Cloverdale residents during a May 22, 2019 town hall. Photo Mary Ann Wilson, Reveille archives

State Sen. Mike McGuire, D-Healdsburg, is hosting a pair of public events next week, calling attention to both the state’s ongoing drought and upcoming fire season.

Wildfire prevention grants — May 17 at noon

The first, a community meeting about wildfire prevention grants, will be held at noon on Monday, May 17. The meeting will be held with McGuire and the California Coastal Conservancy.

“The Conservancy will be funding millions in wildfire prevention grants this year,” wrote McGuire on his Facebook page. “This meeting will be important for cities, counties, special districts and nonprofits who own and manage open space and wildlands. We’ll cover how organizations can apply for future grants and how your organization can be successful in securing future funding to help make these lands around communities more fire safe.”

To register for the event, go here.

Drought town hall — May 20 at 6:30 p.m.

On Thursday, May 20, McGuire will be hosting a town hall devoted to discussing the current drought emergency. Joining McGuire for the virtual town hall will be Joseph James, chairman of the Yurok Tribe, located in Del Norte and Humboldt counties; Grant Davis, general manager of Sonoma Water; Ben Horenstein, general manager of Marin Municipal Water District; and Carmel Angelo, chief executive officer of Mendocino County.

“We’ll be focused on the massive response that will be coming from the state to address the impacts we know our region will see as we enter an extremely dry summer and fall, with unprecedented low water levels,” states McGuire’s website.

To register for the event, go here.

(1) comment

larryL

1. What is being done to dramatically increase the reservoir capacity so we have a reserve of water to get us through the dry seasons. Seems like draught will be an ongoing part of the cycle.

2. What is being done to limit future residential and agricultural growth? -seems like population and use growth adds to the need for more water that is not available.

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